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Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

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Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Handreadered on Sat Jan 01, 2011 11:46 pm

The DSM 5 is being prepared for publication. This will be the 5th edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (universally to be known as the DSM-5). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders brings in $6.5 million in sales on average each year. The book is the basis of psychiatrists’ authority to pronounce upon our mental health, to command health care dollars from insurance companies for treatment and from government agencies for research. It is as important to psychiatrists as the Constitution is to the US government or the Bible is to Christians. Outside the profession, too, the DSM rules, serving as the authoritative text for psychologists, social workers, and other mental health workers; it is invoked by lawyers in arguing over the culpability of criminal defendants and by parents seeking school services for their children. It has influence qround the world.

So I wonder if nay of Arnold Holtzman's 71 new psychological syndromes will be included in the new edition? And even if they are, has he hitched his wagon to the wrong star? See this excellent article in Wired: http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/12/ff_dsmv/all/1.
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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Martijn (admin) on Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:28 pm

Handreadered wrote:Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

....

So I wonder if nay of Arnold Holtzman's 71 new psychological syndromes will be included in the new edition?
Hi Ed,

My short answer to your question would be a simple: 'no'.


My longer answer includes the following notes & observations:

Basically, I would advice anyone not to associate Holtzman's 'hidden syndromes' with the DSM manual for 2 reasons:

- 1) Holtzman didn't describe that his 71 'hidden syndromes' should be recognized as a missing key in the perspective of the DSM manual;
- 2) None of the these 'hidden syndromes' have even been introduced - nor described - in the scientific literature nor in the international literature! Actually a search on the internet indicates that these syndromes have only been mentioned in Holtzman's books + websites of some of his associates.

So, I think this implicates that Holtzman's use of the word 'syndrome' is actually a bit confusing because formally the word refers to a certain kind of pathology & suffering involved; however Holtzman's use of the word 'hidden' suggests that the basic characteristics of his syndromes are usually unconscious to a certain level. And one should also be very aware that the hand characteristics involved... can sometimes even be described as: perfectly normal!

In his books Holtzman described that 'the schizoid temperament' was the very first 'hidden syndrome' that he described. Holtzman associated this syndrome with "... that the middle finger is the heaviest of the fingers" (by thickness; and length - e.g. 40% to 50% of the tip of the middle finger should outrange the tip of the index finger and the tip of the ring finger).

Ed, I think it should be obvious that Holtzman described in his very first 'hidden syndrome'... a relatively normal aspect of the hand!

So, beyond the vocabulary - I think Holtzman is usually talking about issues that relate to aspects of the daily life personality, in a psychoanalytic perspective.

This also explains why some of the most problematic examples of psycholopathology mentioned in the DSM manual - such as issues like: autism and schizophrenia - are not included in his work!

But I can understand you association, because Holtzman has included some of the personality disorders, ADD and ADHD in his work - which of course are mentioned in the DSM manual.

wave

PS. My review of Holtzman's work includes a few more aspects about the position of his work (paragraph 1):
The position of PDC in modern science

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So what are the PDC people treating?

Post  Handreadered on Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:39 pm

If the PDC practitioners are masking their work about problems in every day life in psychoanalytic language, how honest are they with the public that has been educated to consider psychoanalytic labels as indications of serious mental illnesses?
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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Martijn (admin) on Sun Jan 02, 2011 6:26 pm


Hi Ed,

Thanks for responding.

I am sure that we could have a 'firm' discussion on quite a few aspects of PDC and Holtzman's claims about his hand reading method. But I don't see any clear reason to raise the issue of honesty regarding PDC...???

From the perspective of psychoanalytic psychology one can describe any person who has a smoking habit as an oral fixation - which may at first sight sound as a 'intimidating' statement, but basically it is not much more than a simple example of psychoanalytic rethorics (which is nearly always focussed on the deeper psychology of daily life habits).

Ed, can you please explain with more details about what you have in mind?
Because so far your assocations appear to have little ground.


Example of a psychoanalytic joke...


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DSM 5 Continued

Post  Handreadered on Sun Jan 02, 2011 7:50 pm

I would start with the preface to Arnold’s book “Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy” page vii:

“Psychodiagnostic Chirology (PDC) is based primarily on the theoretical conceptualizations and clinical orientation of Sigmund Freud, D. W. Winnicott, Abraham Maslow and Heinz Kohut. Freud’s introspective psychoanalytic constructions give common ground to Winnicott’s “Object Relations Theory, Kohut’s “Self-Psychology” and Maslow’s “Humanist” position (where the gravitation to self fulfillment and self-actualization are the central constructs).”

“PDC is a comprehensive diagnostic discipline applied by professional behavioral specialists in their clinical work. We may visualize it as a form of handreading in psychological diagnosis. Its origins are in the medical and molecular genetic science of dermatoglyphics, which uncovers in the dermal patterns of the palmar surface of the human hand (and foot_ constructions which have a bearing on a wide range of organic and largely inherited disorders.”


Arnold Holtzman is very clear. He is using the dermatoglyphics (and as we read his book other hand characteristics) to describe “organic and largely inherited disorders, and as one reads his book, disorders resulting from nurturing or lack of nurturing in life. In the U.S. such psychological labels, especially once they make their way into the medical literature, are permanent and can and do permanent damage to the subject so labeled. Drug companies find them quite useful for peddling drugs and so they are work enormous sums of money. You expressed outrage with a DMIT and the claim that its use could avoid some youthful suicides (which it may). Isn’t Arnold’s work much worse if all it does is describe the normal problems of life, yet labels the subject with some psychological syndrome?
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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Martijn (admin) on Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:08 pm


Hi Ed,
Thanks for explaining your thoughts. Thanks!

I will respond below to the points that you've made:


Handreadered wrote:I would start with the preface to Arnold’s book “Psychodiagnostic Chirology in Analysis and Therapy” page vii:

“Psychodiagnostic Chirology (PDC) is based primarily on the theoretical conceptualizations and clinical orientation of Sigmund Freud, D. W. Winnicott, Abraham Maslow and Heinz Kohut. Freud’s introspective psychoanalytic constructions give common ground to Winnicott’s “Object Relations Theory, Kohut’s “Self-Psychology” and Maslow’s “Humanist” position (where the gravitation to self fulfillment and self-actualization are the central constructs).”

“PDC is a comprehensive diagnostic discipline applied by professional behavioral specialists in their clinical work. We may visualize it as a form of handreading in psychological diagnosis. Its origins are in the medical and molecular genetic science of dermatoglyphics, which uncovers in the dermal patterns of the palmar surface of the human hand (and foot_ constructions which have a bearing on a wide range of organic and largely inherited disorders.”


Arnold Holtzman is very clear. He is using the dermatoglyphics (and as we read his book other hand characteristics) to describe “organic and largely inherited disorders, and as one reads his book, disorders resulting from nurturing or lack of nurturing in life.

Yes Ed, those are indeed key element in how Holtzman positioned his method in a theoretical perspective.

But I would like to add here that one really should try to understand Holtzman's comments about 'inherited disorders' in a psychoanalytic perspectve. And I think far most of the disorders discussed in PDC belong to a category that should not be associated with severe psychopathology - though again, there are a few (boundary) exceptions such as: ADHD, ADD, and some of the major DSM personality disorders - which are included in PDC.


Handreadered wrote:
In the U.S. such psychological labels, especially once they make their way into the medical literature, are permanent and can and do permanent damage to the subject so labeled. Drug companies find them quite useful for peddling drugs and so they are work enormous sums of money.

Sorry Ed, I count this association as another example of an issue that does not relate directly to PDC. Regarding the 'culture' created by drug companies, I have to remind you that those companies are nearly always focussed on the confirmed and establish forms of (severe) pathology... but obviously:

Holtzman's 'hidden syndromes' do not belong to that category!


Nevertheless, I could understand any point related to the PDC vocabulary - I already described in my earlier responses that I do recognize that some aspects of the PDC vocabulary can easy result in confusion.

But I still don't see how your issue of 'dishonesty' is involved here.... scratch


Handreadered wrote:You expressed outrage with a DMIT and the claim that its use could avoid some youthful suicides (which it may). Isn’t Arnold’s work much worse if all it does is describe the normal problems of life, yet labels the subject with some psychological syndrome?

I can only advice you again to try to understand Holtzman's use of the word '(hidden) syndrome' in the psychoanalytic perspective; the 'smoking' example that I have mentioned is a clear demonstration of how psychoanalysis explores the deeper motives of relatively simple daily life behaviors.

While Freud's orignal psychoanalysis theory is today generally described as 'outdated' (for various reasons), I think it is an 'out-of-contex' observation to associate the PDC vocabulary with the 'culture' created by drug companies - simply because psychoanalysis oriented therapists typically are trying to solve problems WITHOUT the use of any medicine!!!


Regarding DMIT's prevention claim regarding 'suicide among students'... Ed, don't you recognize the suggesting element in their claim? I think that is a typical example of an immoral appeal - which is focuss on the suggestion that making an incorrect decision regarding a child's school could end up in suicide. While this appears to be speculation only, and therefore it can easily describe as an unacceptable element in a commercial franchise-product!

NOTICE: If there had been any evidence to back that claim, I am sure that the DMIT developers would have refered to it in their commercial protocol - just like they did regarding certain other elements in their 'product'!!!


After saying this one could wonder: how fair is it to describe PDC as 'much worse' than DMIT...?

My answer would be the following:

A major difference between PDC and DMIT is that PDC never became a commercial product, and I think Holtzman never made any likewise (immoral) claims.

Though I am sceptical about Holtzman's claim of "100% validity" (see: 'Psychodiagnostic Chirology' page 152) - because that claim could easily be described as 'unrealistic', and likely an utopy. But even if my point of scepsis is justified, I can not describe that claim as 'immoral' ... or anything related to 'dishonesty'.

And as far as I know Holtzman is very protective regarding his method: he only recognizes a very small group of people as a PDC analyst - after a long process of training. Holtzman presents on his website an overview of the official PDC analysts (so far people from only 3 countries):
http://www.pdc.co.il/ind1.htm


Ed, after making these observations I hope you can understand that beyond the issue of the use of confusing vocabulary - I see little ground to compare PDC with DMIT.

wave


PS. For those readers who are not yet familiar with DMIT, this refers to the commercial 'Dermatoglyphic Multiple Intelligence Test' which I have introduced at this forum: Thumb rule DMIT (IQ test) - Does intelligence correlated with fingerprints & dermatoglyphic?

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More on DSM 5 and Arnold

Post  Handreadered on Sun Jan 02, 2011 11:28 pm

Martijn:

You should travel more. Then you will have realized, at least in the eyes of Mary Lai and numbers of her supporters, that Arnold attempted to coopt her program that you and others call DMIT in 2006. He sought to make her program a part of PDC. She was furious and it caused a bit of a stir at her 2006 conference as a chill discended on the conference. While he did not attend that conference (sending only a video which almost was not shown) he did travel to Hong Kong apparently in his quest to co-opt MME or at least the English speaking leaders there. (See photos on his web site). Also one (Annette Levy) or more of his PDC practitioners traveled to Hong Kong to learn the MME system. I believe that Arnold taught a course in PDC in July 2007 in Hong Kong and Fritz Pang and Irene Tsang from New Horizons visited Israel perhaps in 2007. Arnold wrote to me on March, 2007 of his plans:

“PDC here has expanded considerably to include a clinical chapter that addresses neurotic and pathological disorders in children. So that beyond analysis it has expanded to include professional clinical intervention. That's quite a jump. You can have a fair idea then of the level of the new people who have come to identify with PDC. It is essentially in this clinical context that MME is expected to be incorporated into the work of our people.”

Mary Lai was not amused. However, any rift between Hong Kong and MME appears to have been mended by the time of the 2010 conference. Anyway, apparently Dr. Arnold Holtzman, Ph.D. has a much higher opinion of DMIT than you do. Mary now claims here program is in use in ten countries. Is Israel one of them?
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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Martijn (admin) on Mon Jan 03, 2011 12:31 am


Ed, thanks for the info!

I will contact Holtzman and invite him to comment on my summary of materials related to the DMIT test.

By the way, I remember that earlier last year (I think it was about 8 months ago) you informed me that Mary's method is actually slightly different from Lysander Poon's commercial DMIT spin-off from her research.

I am now wondering: did Holtzman really embrace the DMIT method.... or only Mary's approach?

Anyway, thanks for sharing!!


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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Manfred on Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:40 am

Ed and Martijn, thank you for inform us. - Manfred

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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  mooky on Mon Apr 11, 2011 6:17 pm

This was an interesting article. Yesterday I watched a documentary called "Autism-Like: Graham's Story -- A film by Erik Linthorst." It does not address DSM V nor Arnold's latest works. However, it does bring to like how diagnosis, and specifically treatment, has often been driven by what qualifies for financial aid to help special needs children.

As it turned out, Graham has what is now being termed as Sensory Processing Disorder or SPD. There was no mention of hand analysis but it was very enlightening nonetheless.

Here is a link to the website for the documentary:

http://www.autisticlike.com/


Last edited by mooky on Mon Apr 11, 2011 6:29 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Added link to website)

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Re: Will any of Arnold's Psychological syndromes make the DSM 5?

Post  Martijn (admin) on Mon Apr 11, 2011 6:40 pm


Hello mooky,

The new DSM-5 is planned to published in 2013.

Regarding the (current) DSM-4, so far I am only aware that 'minor physical abnormalities/anomalies' (MPA's) are only mentioned (not specified) in the diagnosis guidelines that relate to ADHD and schizophrenia.

Plus 'hand flapping' with autism & Asperger syndrome, and 'hand/finger biting' also with autism.


But I hope we will see more of those MPA's mentioned in the DSM-5.

For example, it would make sense if Prof. John T. Manning's "2D:4D digit ratio" will be associated with ADHD, schizophrenia... & autism. Though this topic could be listed under the unwritten header 'controversial research'

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