Your opinion & share...
Latest topics
» Marriage/ Trident on palm
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Sat Nov 30, 2019 6:18 pm by Kunvaal

» What does this form of life line mean?
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Fri Nov 29, 2019 2:33 pm by cromaveg

» Work and children
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:16 pm by Stefania

» interesting Fate line?
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:08 am by amit_plawat

» Want to know about my marriage
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Thu Nov 21, 2019 7:17 am by pravin kumar

» interesting Fate line / Hand? Your Reading Please
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Mon Nov 18, 2019 2:56 pm by pravin kumar

» Pentagram in Palm lines?
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:44 pm by Cattblack5

» Voltage Line? (= Johnny Fincham's 'Intensity Line'!)
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:23 am by 1970

» Request for a general read and focussed on sun mount signs
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:45 am by nishaghai

» Horizontal lines and Grilles on fingerprints
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:34 am by nishaghai

» A CRY FOR HELP
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:29 am by nishaghai

» looks like a loop on the palm but not a loop?
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:06 pm by sonu21

» Michael 'Air' Jordan: hands of a basketball superstar!
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Fri Sep 27, 2019 3:48 am by Whitewash112358

» I am very unlucky in terms of finding a job. Please help.
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Sat Sep 21, 2019 11:53 am by Cev

» Cant figure out why my head line looks like it does!!
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Icon_minitime1Thu Sep 19, 2019 5:41 am by nishaghai

Search
 
 

Display results as :
 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Who is online?
In total there are 27 users online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 27 Guests

None

[ View the whole list ]


Most users ever online was 293 on Mon Jul 25, 2011 11:22 am
Moderators & partners

• Discover the Modern Hand Reading Forum partners:

Would you like to see your website listed?

Modern Hand Reading Forum Partners

Pointing finger: check this out!

Statistics
We have 5786 registered users
The newest registered user is anuragsingh28

Our users have posted a total of 46725 messages in 4790 subjects
Top posting users this month
oxatti
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
pravin kumar
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
Anisha
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
Kunvaal
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
Lynn
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
micjam
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 

Top posting users this week
oxatti
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
pravin kumar
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
Lynn
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
Kunvaal
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 
micjam
The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting17The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting19The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Voting18 

Recommendations

• The FREE hand reading services at the Modern Hand Reading Forum are being continued in 2019 with the assistance of Google adsense!


Pointing finger: check this out!



Google+
MAJOR HAND READING SYNONYMS
Palmistry, Palm Reading, Hand Analysis, Chirology & Chiromancy.

Learn how to read hands according the Modern Hand Reading paradigm & you can use this forum as your palm reading guide!

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Page 10 of 17 Previous  1 ... 6 ... 9, 10, 11 ... 13 ... 17  Next

Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:10 pm

Patti wrote:Your letters in red warned us to read the text properly as you emphasized the triradial point was first mentioned by Cummins & Midlo and not in the work from Wilder and Wentworth. If you had only read the rest of the paragraph describing Fig. 78 Shocked you would have seen for yourself they did describe the 'point of delta'.

Lynn pointed out to you that the Henry speaks of 2 configurations. The ridges meeting at a point in the center is the 3 pointed Star and the diverging ridges are an angle of the triangle. FBI's focus is primarily on the marginal angle, which you see as the main bifurcation.

The only issue with your argument is that it continues to give priority to one kind of configuration, the star. ALL sources describe the STAR and the DELTA.
Henry says "either" and "or".

Patti, I have no access to Wilder's book. So I can not read what else he wrote. But from the little circles in his illustration I can understand that he also talked about the 'point of delta' on other pages.

But I thought it was useful to make my observation very explicite with red words, since I think that his definition for his 'delta'... should not be confused with how the word 'triradius' was later defined by Cummins & Midlo, Penrose, Schaumann & Alter, and Loesch.


Henry's "either and or" only illustrates the fact that he is only talking about a rather larger concept in his 'delta' (which was originally also presented by Galton), which is basically only a representative for the 'triradial area'... but not the triradius itself!

So, he is also not describing two types of 'triradii' (he only describes two types of 'triradial areas').


Loesch's definition is the most specified definition for the triradius itself that we have seen so far in the books:

"The triradius is formed when (c) three fields of paralllel lines meet and (b) its centre has three radiant lines which lie approaximately at (a) 120 degrees to one another."

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:11 pm

Martijn (admin) wrote:Lynn, ... no need to feel pushed by my words. You better take the time you need before giving an agreement.

But maybe you remember how I presented in the first post of this discussion an ADVANCED definition for the triradius composed by three elements? I quote:

"A 'triradus' can be recognized by the presence of the following three elements:
- (a) a meeting of 3 individual 'ridge fields'; the meeting-point of the 3 ridges is the 'triradial point', and the 3 'radiants' starting from this point should make angles close to 120 degrees - and all angles should be higher than 90 degrees. [NOTICE: ridges manifest in a fingerprint as 'black lines'].
- (b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."



Well, Loesch's definition explicitely describes all three elements::

"The triradius is formed when (c) three fields of paralllel lines meet and (b) its centre has three radiant lines which lie approaximately at (a) 120 degrees to one another."

That is why I have described Loesch's definition as not only the most recent definition that we have (except Coppock's rather short definition of course but basically only relates to the first element in my definition).


Both my earlier definition & Loesch's definition describe why Schaumann & Alter's B, C, D and E ... can not be described as representing examples of a 'triradius'.

bounce Pressure is probably building up for you again, maybe I hope that these DEFINITIONS will finally make 'your fence' collaps to the ground! ( Wink ) ... so that you can not jump on it again!


But as an alternative... maybe we can now simply agree about the confirming 'value' of Loesch's definition for my definition?

Very Happy
You better take the time you need before giving an agreement.
(and what if I disagree? lol! )

I still think this is your definition of a triradius Martijn. It is the way you have interpreted the various quotes, but not necessarily the way I interpret them.

re Loesch's definition

"The triradius is formed when (c) three fields of paralllel lines meet and (b) its centre has three radiant lines which lie approaximately at (a) 120 degrees to one another."
That's fine for the definition of a 'star' triradius. But we know that not all triradii are 'star' type. Loesch's definition does not describe or define a 'triangular' (or C&M 'delta') type triradius.

Regarding your definition, I have no problem with
(b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."


Regarding (a) a meeting of 3 individual 'ridge fields'; the meeting-point of the 3 ridges is the 'triradial point', and the 3 'radiants' starting from this point should make angles close to 120 degrees - and all angles should be higher than 90 degrees. [NOTICE: ridges manifest in a fingerprint as 'black lines'].

Again, this seems to be describing only a 'star shape triradius'. If you are talking about the 'meeting point' as a place where 3 ridge fields actually join together, then this definition does not work for a C&M delta type (triangular) triradius. In the delta type, the triradial point is in the centre of the triangle shape (which is a white space, not a joining of 3 ridges). We know that there are not always 3 radiants originating from the triradial point.
So your definitions do not cover all options for a triradius.

Both my earlier definition & Loesch's definition describe why Schaumann & Alter's B, C, D and E ... can not be described as representing examples of a 'triradius'.

I don't see any reason why Schaumann & Alter's B,C,D,E cannot fit with these two parts.....
(b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."


(by the way I'm not on the fence, I have always felt that your definition was too limited !)

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:18 pm

Patti wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:Lynn, ... no need to feel pushed by my words. You better take the time you need before giving an agreement.


How long does she need to take to "disagree"

rolling on the floor (good thing there was no more coffee left to spill)

lol! ah I see you already noticed Martijn's 'contradiction' - 'no need to feel pushed..... (but in time you WILL agree!!)' sorry for paraphrasing you Martijn, I am sure you didn't mean it like that!! ;-)

by the way patti, sorry about your coffee, I guess it was the siamese twins bit, just trying to portray how 'meeting' is not necessarily ' joining' Razz

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:22 pm

Patti wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:
Patti wrote:
The bifurcation or Star is on the right.

Very Happy ... Sounds to me that you just called your 'star-triradius' a bifurcation. Or did I misunderstood your words? (Because this contradicts with e.g. your earlier statement that you thought I had found my own state, named: 'Bifurcation land' ... despite that I had to disagree, I enjoyed that comment very much Very Happy )


Patti, it would be helpful if you explain this comment at this stage..
Because does this implicate that you now finally recognize as well that a 'triradius' can been recognized as an element that can be associated with 'bifurcations' (additionally of course, only the triradius requires to have certain specifications that relate to the angles, etc.).

Hahaha!
I did that for you so you'd understand the Star pattern is the 3 ridges meeting.

Actually after reading quotes from Wilder (earlier pdf Lynn shared) suggesting that forking ridges are just as much the meeting of two ridges rather than a splitting of one, I'm more inclined to understand why they use the term bifurcation when only two ridges meet at an angle.

This concept of ridges meeting rather than splitting works better with the concept of development and the rows forming due to perpendicular tension.

So the decision between a bifurcation and 3 ridges meeting at 120 degrees is as you pointed out the distance between the branches.

Two ridges running parallel and running/leaning into each other become conjoined.

In the triradial area the meeting of these 3 ridges should be based on a ridge from 3 fields and not ridges from 2 fields meeting.

A bifurcation is typically two ridges meeting or splitting. I think the degree apart is important.

I'm now ok with calling the Star a bifurcation.

I do think it's misleading to do so.

Thumbs up!


Finally! Okay... we made significant progress:


Patti, I now offically welcome you in... 'Bifurcation land'!!

Dear 'bifurcation-fellow', I hope you will enjoy your stay, but don't expect any surprizes... your life will probably continue as it was cheers

( lol! )


(Though I don't understand in what perspective you made the red comment... you're welcome to explain it a bit more, but I probably will not continue a debate about that detail)

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:24 pm

Martijn (admin) wrote:Patti, I have no access to Wilder's book. So I can not read what else he wrote.]

Martijn, are you not able to access it from the second link that Patti gave us last night?
http://www.archive.org/details/personalidentifi00wild
I've downloaded the pdf, or you can read it online.

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:28 pm

Martijun, whilst I was also reading Wider's/Henry's 'delta' as "triradial area"
please note a comment I made earlier this evening....
Now it becomes confusing! on page 194 Wilder also says....
"in all cases where the word delta is used the point of delta is intended."

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:31 pm

Lynn wrote:
Patti wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:Lynn, ... no need to feel pushed by my words. You better take the time you need before giving any agreement.


How long does she need to take to "disagree"

rolling on the floor (good thing there was no more coffee left to spill)

lol! ah I see you already noticed Martijn's 'contradiction' - 'no need to feel pushed..... (but in time you WILL agree!!)' sorry for paraphrasing you Martijn, I am sure you didn't mean it like that!! ;-)

by the way patti, sorry about your coffee, I guess it was the siamese twins bit, just trying to portray how 'meeting' is not necessarily ' joining' Razz

...Okay, I see: I better should have added a letter 'y' (see above).

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:32 pm

Lynn wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:Patti, I have no access to Wilder's book. So I can not read what else he wrote.]

Martijn, are you not able to access it from the second link that Patti gave us last night?
http://www.archive.org/details/personalidentifi00wild
I've downloaded the pdf, or you can read it online.

Thanks!

(I hadn't noticed that I could read it online)

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:35 pm

Lynn wrote:Martijun, whilst I was also reading Wider's/Henry's 'delta' as "triradial area"
please note a comment I made earlier this evening....
Now it becomes confusing! on page 194 Wilder also says....
"in all cases where the word delta is used the point of delta is intended."

Yes Lynn, I know and I understand how that comment relates to the little circle in his illustration.

However, despite that he is talking about a 'triradial pioint'... his concept of a 'delta' only relates to the concept of a 'triradial area', and not to the 'triradius' itself.

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:44 pm

Loesch described another possibility from Penrose. A cusp effect.

I don't think she understood the waving in of ridges from 3 fields forms a triangle so she dismissed the cusp by saying:

"This type (describing a pattern from Smith 1979), which can be in some respects related to a cusp, does not usually occur in the ridged skin and therefore will not be discussed in further detail."

Here, I also think she saw the 'empty or white space' of the grooves in the triangle shape but didn't see the shape of 3 ridges meeting at the corners which Penrose also illustrated.

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 4-29-210

So, just because Loesch chose not to discuss it further, doesn't mean, it doesn't exist and is acknowledged by other experts in the field at the time.
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:56 pm

Martijn (admin) wrote:
Patti wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:
Patti wrote:
The bifurcation or Star is on the right.

Very Happy ... Sounds to me that you just called your 'star-triradius' a bifurcation. Or did I misunderstood your words? (Because this contradicts with e.g. your earlier statement that you thought I had found my own state, named: 'Bifurcation land' ... despite that I had to disagree, I enjoyed that comment very much Very Happy )


Patti, it would be helpful if you explain this comment at this stage..
Because does this implicate that you now finally recognize as well that a 'triradius' can been recognized as an element that can be associated with 'bifurcations' (additionally of course, only the triradius requires to have certain specifications that relate to the angles, etc.).

Hahaha!
I did that for you so you'd understand the Star pattern is the 3 ridges meeting.

Actually after reading quotes from Wilder (earlier pdf Lynn shared) suggesting that forking ridges are just as much the meeting of two ridges rather than a splitting of one, I'm more inclined to understand why they use the term bifurcation when only two ridges meet at an angle.

This concept of ridges meeting rather than splitting works better with the concept of development and the rows forming due to perpendicular tension.

So the decision between a bifurcation and 3 ridges meeting at 120 degrees is as you pointed out the distance between the branches.

Two ridges running parallel and running/leaning into each other become conjoined.

In the triradial area the meeting of these 3 ridges should be based on a ridge from 3 fields and not ridges from 2 fields meeting.

A bifurcation is typically two ridges meeting or splitting. I think the degree apart is important.

I'm now ok with calling the Star a bifurcation.

I do think it's misleading to do so.

Thumbs up!


Finally! Okay... we made significant progress:


Patti, I now offically welcome you in... 'Bifurcation land'!!

Dear 'bifurcation-fellow', I hope you will enjoy your stay, but don't expect any surprizes... your life will probably continue as it was cheers

( lol! )


(Though I don't understand in what perspective you made the red comment... you're welcome to explain it a bit more, but I probably will not continue a debate about that detail)

Hopefully you'll soon join Lynn and me in the land of triangles, too.

Do note, that I see a bifurcation as involving only 2 ridges. The FBI illustrates a bifurcation that represents the marginal angle of the triangle as the area of the 2 diverging parallel ridges.

For the sake of common language, I've agreed the Star can appear as a bifurcation.

Wilder describes it as a Y shape but with very widely spaced branches.

Loesch reconfirms that less than 90 degrees is not relating to a triradius. But, in her quote doing so, she is saying that about the 'cusp'. The inside angles of 3 cusps meeting would be 60 degrees if it were the inside of an equilateral triangle.

In reading this, I think Loesch as she states, chose to only work with the 3 ridges meeting in the center. This may give you confirmation for your singular bifurcation approach, but it's not accurate nor is it backed up by any other resource.


Last edited by Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:59 pm

Lynn wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:Lynn, ... no need to feel pushed by my words. You better take the time you need before giving an agreement.

But maybe you remember how I presented in the first post of this discussion an ADVANCED definition for the triradius composed by three elements? I quote:

"A 'triradus' can be recognized by the presence of the following three elements:
- (a) a meeting of 3 individual 'ridge fields'; the meeting-point of the 3 ridges is the 'triradial point', and the 3 'radiants' starting from this point should make angles close to 120 degrees - and all angles should be higher than 90 degrees. [NOTICE: ridges manifest in a fingerprint as 'black lines'].
- (b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."



Well, Loesch's definition explicitely describes all three elements::

"The triradius is formed when (c) three fields of paralllel lines meet and (b) its centre has three radiant lines which lie approaximately at (a) 120 degrees to one another."

That is why I have described Loesch's definition as not only the most recent definition that we have (except Coppock's rather short definition of course but basically only relates to the first element in my definition).


Both my earlier definition & Loesch's definition describe why Schaumann & Alter's B, C, D and E ... can not be described as representing examples of a 'triradius'.

bounce Pressure is probably building up for you again, maybe I hope that these DEFINITIONS will finally make 'your fence' collaps to the ground! ( Wink ) ... so that you can not jump on it again!


But as an alternative... maybe we can now simply agree about the confirming 'value' of Loesch's definition for my definition?

Very Happy
You better take the time you need before giving an agreement.
(and what if I disagree? lol! )

I still think this is your definition of a triradius Martijn. It is the way you have interpreted the various quotes, but not necessarily the way I interpret them.

re Loesch's definition

"The triradius is formed when (c) three fields of paralllel lines meet and (b) its centre has three radiant lines which lie approaximately at (a) 120 degrees to one another."
That's fine for the definition of a 'star' triradius. But we know that not all triradii are 'star' type. Loesch's definition does not describe or define a 'triangular' (or C&M 'delta') type triradius.

Regarding your definition, I have no problem with
(b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."


Regarding (a) a meeting of 3 individual 'ridge fields'; the meeting-point of the 3 ridges is the 'triradial point', and the 3 'radiants' starting from this point should make angles close to 120 degrees - and all angles should be higher than 90 degrees. [NOTICE: ridges manifest in a fingerprint as 'black lines'].

Again, this seems to be describing only a 'star shape triradius'. If you are talking about the 'meeting point' as a place where 3 ridge fields actually join together, then this definition does not work for a C&M delta type (triangular) triradius. In the delta type, the triradial point is in the centre of the triangle shape (which is a white space, not a joining of 3 ridges). We know that there are not always 3 radiants originating from the triradial point.
So your definitions do not cover all options for a triradius.

Both my earlier definition & Loesch's definition describe why Schaumann & Alter's B, C, D and E ... can not be described as representing examples of a 'triradius'.

I don't see any reason why Schaumann & Alter's B,C,D,E cannot fit with these two parts.....
(b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."


(by the way I'm not on the fence, I have always felt that your definition was too limited !)

Lynn, first of all: there are no two types of 'triradii' - and there is not a single book which has suggested that there are two well-defined types of 'triradii'!


Now. regarding what Patti calls a 'star triradius'... well, it is just a perfectly normal triradius. So I have never understood why she wanted to add the word 'star' - but I never made a big deal about because she only used those words as a name.

However, of course I do agree that the 'triangular-plot'-variant is not explicitely mentioned in my definition, but I think there is not need to mention that variant in my definition... because usually these little ridge-triangles manifest as very little elements that are hardly visible for the bare eye.

However, please also be aware that also in the F.B.I. book in the rather short definitions - which are always presented with italic words - these are not meant for summarizing al possible variations.

For example, the list of 6 elements is formally also not included in the delta-definition.

How does this sound so far?


And finally, regarding your comment about that Schaumann & Alter's figure 3.5 B,C,D and E do meet the 2nd and 3th part of my definition:

Do you remember the banana-song?

Of course...: because the 2nd + 3th part of my definition describe the essentials of a triradial area!

I hope this makes sense now as well?


NOTICE: Since the introduction of my definition, I have made some progress as well:

Because now I clearly see that the first part of my triradius-definition directly relates to how Coppock has defined the triradius, and all three parts of my definition directly related to the 3 elements that Loesch has described!

If I would have been aware of the definitions presented by Loesch & Coppock... then I probably would have designed my definition a little bit differently.


So, maybe I will rewrite with an explicite reference to Loesch (rather old world) and Coppock (modern work)

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:09 pm

Another point when referring to Loesch's work, she mentions in her introduction she is working with 'ridges'.

She also states there are two branches of the subject about minutiae. One is geometrical and mathematical and the other is mainly statistical. She says "The subsequent chapters are each concerned with one special topic."

She's not working with Penrose's theoretical radiants or Cummins & Midlo's triangular plot. Just the part about actual ridges. It's a specialized topic and shouldn't be applied in a way to narrow down an existing wider topic.
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:27 pm

Patti wrote:Another point when referring to Loesch's work, she mentions in her introduction she is working with 'ridges'.

She also states there are two branches of the subject about minutiae. One is geometrical and mathematical and the other is mainly statistical. She says "The subsequent chapters are each concerned with one special topic."

She's not working with Penrose's theoretical radiants or Cummins & Midlo's triangular plot. Just the part about actual ridges. It's a specialized topic and shouldn't be applied in a way to narrow down an existing wider topic.

Patti, Loesch's work is not designed for practical purposes in terms of answering the question: 'how to classify a fingerprint?'

Loesch describes the underlying rules that describe how the ridges manifest. And the issue of the 'triradial plot' irrelevant for that purpose.

By the way, Loesch's work is highly influenced by Penrose.


And finally... Schaumann & Alter + the F.B.I. do not work in their rules with any kind of 'triradial plot' either!

___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:29 pm

Martijn (admin) wrote:
Patti wrote:Another point when referring to Loesch's work, she mentions in her introduction she is working with 'ridges'.

She also states there are two branches of the subject about minutiae. One is geometrical and mathematical and the other is mainly statistical. She says "The subsequent chapters are each concerned with one special topic."

She's not working with Penrose's theoretical radiants or Cummins & Midlo's triangular plot. Just the part about actual ridges. It's a specialized topic and shouldn't be applied in a way to narrow down an existing wider topic.

Patti, Loesch's work is not designed for practical purposes in terms of answering the question: 'how to classify a fingerprint?'

Loesch describes the underlying rules that describe how the ridges manifest. And the issue of the 'triradial plot' irrelevant for that purpose.

By the way, Loesch's work is highly influenced by Penrose.


And finally... Schaumann & Alter + the F.B.I. do not work in their rules with any kind of 'triradial plot' either!

Yes, Loesch is only working with mathematics and geometrics in ridges and the formation of patterns. Specifically. Not in actual fingerprints - as in regards to 'statistical' data.
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:32 pm

You are also incorrect about the FBI. The triangular plot is all over the place in the figures. Including the first one with the 2 fields and the lake.

They explain you must get this concept of the delta or you'll mess up.

You're still messing up.

lol
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Martijn (admin) on Fri Apr 29, 2011 9:43 pm

Patti wrote:You are also incorrect about the FBI. The triangular plot is all over the place in the figures. Including the first one with the 2 fields and the lake.

They explain you must get this concept of the delta or you'll mess up.

You're still messing up.

lol

Hi Patti,

I think nowhere in the F.B.I. is any comment made about any 'triangular' shape in the ridges. So the examples where there is any such shape seen... they allows simply follow the path of the rules (+ the principles related to the river delta) - which are unrelated to any 'triangular' shape at all.

But agian, also in the work of Schaumann & Alter the concept of the 'triangular plot' is not seen at all.

And you should really not underestimate the fact that in Cummins & Midlo the concept of the 'triangular plot' is only described in the perspective of Galton's theory, and on page 58 they describe in their comments about the definition that in the (practical) usage they do not discriminate the 'triangular plot' from your 'star-triangle':

"In the usage here adopted no discrimination is made between these two main forms of structural organization. Since a triradius is present even when there is no true delta, the term triradius is used througout this work."

Therefore formally one should better not speak about just 2 'different' types of triradii - because none of the books have made such a recommendation.


I think it makes sense if we continue in our discussion to use the label 'triangular triradius', but I am not going to adopt your suggestion of a 'star-triradius'... because that sounds to me quite like describing a... 'round ball'.

I hope you understand.


___________________________________________
sunny

Martijn van Mensvoort
Hand researcher & psychologist in The Netherlands (Holland)
Presents: Multi-Perspective Palm Reading + the Global Palm Reading Network
Martijn (admin)
Martijn (admin)
Admin

Posts : 5257
Join date : 2010-07-23
Location : The Netherlands

http://www.handresearch.com

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Fri Apr 29, 2011 10:34 pm

Martijn said
Patti, I now offically welcome you in... 'Bifurcation land'!!

OK, now I read Wilder, Mrtijn will be pleased to know that I am also happy to take an extended vacation in Bifurcation land.Very Happy
With the same reservations as Patti: bifurcation looks like a star triradius, but the ridge flow is different. bifurcation definition is one ridge that divides, but can also look like 2 ridges abutting. Whereas a 'true' 'star' triradius is 3 radiants coming from (or meeting at) a central point. BUt I concede that it looks like a bifurcation with a wider angle.

Patti said
Hopefully you'll soon join Lynn and me in the land of triangles, too.

@Patti - rolling on the floor


___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Fri Apr 29, 2011 11:07 pm

Martijn (admin) wrote:Lynn, first of all: there are no two types of 'triradii' - and there is not a single book which has suggested that there are two well-defined types of 'triradii'!

Oh...nooo! Are you sure?
Cummins & Midlo P58 "A delta in the strict sense is a triangular plot, and the triradius is represented by the ridges forming it's boundary. A triradius, however, may be formed when there is no delta in the strict sense, being formed in this instance by three ridges raditing from a common point".
That is defining two types of triradii - which we are referring to as the 'triangular' and the 'star' shaped.

C&M also define it as
"TRIRADII. A triradius is located at the meeting point of three opposing ridge systems. In a typical whorl or loop such a meeting occurs that the conjunction of the three topographic zones - the pattern area, the distal transverse system and the proximal transverse system."


Now. regarding what Patti calls a 'star triradius'... well, it is just a perfectly normal triradius. So I have never understood why she wanted to add the word 'star' - but I never made a big deal about because she only used those words as a name.
I am happy to use Patti's term 'star triradius' because then we instantly know which particular formation of triradius we are talking about. As opposed to another 'perfectly normal' variant of a 'triangular plot'.

However, of course I do agree that the 'triangular-plot'-variant is not explicitely mentioned in my definition, but I think there is not need to mention that variant in my definition... because usually these little ridge-triangles manifest as very little elements that are hardly visible for the bare eye.
In some other discussion you said "It would be silly to say that Cummins & Midlo are wrong". If triangular plot is not worth mentioning, why did they mention it? And why would Wilder colour the triangular plots in black? Martijn really I am mystified at your recent pedantic refusal to recognise the boundaries of the triangular plot as a triradius! Especially as you were the one who originally convinced me that I should take notice of these 'little triangles' as being triradii !!

However, please also be aware that also in the F.B.I. book in the rather short definitions - which are always presented with italic words - these are not meant for summarizing al possible variations.

For example, the list of 6 elements is formally also not included in the delta-definition.

How does this sound so far?

I think all the books do not give full definitions for all possibilities.


And finally, regarding your comment about that Schaumann & Alter's figure 3.5 B,C,D and E do meet the 2nd and 3th part of my definition:

Do you remember the banana-song?

Of course...: because the 2nd + 3th part of my definition describe the essentials of a triradial area!

I hope this makes sense now as well?

If you are offering me a banana, I don't accept it at the moment thanks.
Your definition says
"A 'triradus' can be recognized by the presence of the following three elements:
- (a) .... <snip>.....
- (b) the confluence of 3 parallel 'ridge systems' [NOTICE: 'ridge system' = one ridge + the surrounding grooves];
- (c) it's location borders the 'three topographic zones' of the fingerprint [NOTICE: topographic areas include: (I) proximal area + (II) distal area + (III) pattern area]."


Are you now changing that definition to "a triradial area" can be recognised by....(b & c) ??

NOTICE: Since the introduction of my definition, I have made some progress as well:

Because now I clearly see that the first part of my triradius-definition directly relates to how Coppock has defined the triradius, and all three parts of my definition directly related to the 3 elements that Loesch has described!

If I would have been aware of the definitions presented by Loesch & Coppock... then I probably would have designed my definition a little bit differently.

So, maybe I will rewrite with an explicite reference to Loesch (rather old world) and Coppock (modern work)
[quote]

Since the introduction of your definition, I think Patti & I have also made some progress. Wink
Looking forward to the re-write, but I hope the definition does not become even narrower.

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Fri Apr 29, 2011 11:48 pm

Martijn (admin) wrote:
Lynn wrote:
Martijn (admin) wrote:Patti, I have no access to Wilder's book. So I can not read what else he wrote.]

Martijn, are you not able to access it from the second link that Patti gave us last night?
http://www.archive.org/details/personalidentifi00wild
I've downloaded the pdf, or you can read it online.

Thanks!

(I hadn't noticed that I could read it online)

Now that you can read the book. Read page 121. The whole page. The footnote at the bottom is especially important as it describes the Star (3 ridges meeting at the center) and the Delta (the triangle with 3 ridges meeting at the corners).

What amazed me is that I thought I had newly named these patterns, borrowing from electrical circuitry technology for alternating currents, and was totally blown away when Lynn mentioned Wilder's 3 pointed triangles looked a lot like the one in my own illustration of the triradius. I hadn't seen anything from Wilder other than quotes and references.

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Books_10
(folds relate to skin folds and not ridges - primates and humans are compared)

They were referred to as the Star and the Delta a century ago!

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Trirad16

The triradius "suggests a 3 pointed star, and includes both the delta and its three radiating lines"

Translates to the triradius is a triangle from which radiates 3 ridges.

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Delta_17
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Sat Apr 30, 2011 12:35 am

Here is yet another definition of triradius.....

http://www.csse.uwa.edu.au/~bobh/research/fingerprints/Yanchep2006_bobh.pdf

2. A triradius or delta is formed when three fields surround a point, leaving a gap in the centre.

what do you think they mean by "leaving a gap in the centre." ?

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Sat Apr 30, 2011 12:49 am

Lynn wrote:Here is yet another definition of triradius.....

http://www.csse.uwa.edu.au/~bobh/research/fingerprints/Yanchep2006_bobh.pdf

2. A triradius or delta is formed when three fields surround a point, leaving a gap in the centre.

what do you think they mean by "leaving a gap in the centre." ?

I'd say they are describing this:

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Triang11

This is an interesting statement - just below the one you quote:

² A tented arch is similar to the plain arch, but contains
one ridge with a high curvature and contains one
loop
and one delta. "
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Sat Apr 30, 2011 12:54 am

And here's another good quote:

2.1 History of fingerprints
Finger ridge patterns were noted and described in detail by
scientists as early as the 17th century [12]. Sir Francis Galton
(1822-1911), began in the late 1880's the process of classifying
Fingerprints according to the presence and position of
"triangles", or delta regions, in the ridge. Following
on from this work, Edward Henry(1859-1931) identified
patterns in the ridge flow which were to become the basis of
the standard fingerprint classification scheme described in
section 2.2.1 [12, p. 278].
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Patti on Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:06 am

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Meetin10

That was a good analogy Lynn!

If you and your friends who meet and converge at a cafe table (simulated above) continue to move inward to where your hands all meet, your arms will together form a 3 pointed Star. If you stretch your arms out, you will have a Delta shape.

Idea
Patti
Patti

Posts : 3912
Join date : 2010-07-24

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Lynn on Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:18 am

Patti wrote:The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Meetin10

That was a good analogy Lynn!

If you and your friends who meet and converge at a cafe table (simulated above) continue to move inward to where your hands all meet, your arms will together form a 3 pointed Star. If you stretch your arms out, you will have a Delta shape.

Idea

(for some reason pics aren't showing tonight, so I can't see your pic Patti!)
but ...what I've been trying to explain for ages... we don't need to imagine that our hands meet, or that we stretch our arms out (this is the problem I had all along with your "imaginary yellow triangles" & "imaginary green radiants" - we don't need them!). If we 'meet' or 'converge' (around the table at the cafe)is enough - we don't need to physically 'join' our arms/hands - or join the inermost ridges of the 3 fields ). In my analogy it's enough for the 3 people to 'meet around the table' or in fingerprints for the 3 ridge fields to 'join at the grooves' (cafe table in my analogy being white space where the grooves join) to fulfil the criteria of 3 ridge systems meeting. Then to trace the radiants we have to move to the ridge.
(Patti, you and I are so nearly understanding each other!) Thumbs up!

___________________________________________
Lynn
www.handanalysis.co.uk
Lynn
Lynn

Posts : 2451
Join date : 2010-07-24
Location : Devon, England

http://www.handanalysis.co.uk

Back to top Go down

The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition! - Page 10 Empty Re: The TRIRADIUS in a fingerprint: how it develops, it's characteristics + a definition!

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 10 of 17 Previous  1 ... 6 ... 9, 10, 11 ... 13 ... 17  Next

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum